28 August 2008

Curry source

For my evening curry I thought I pick up another couple of bottles of cheap Asahi from the supermarket. There was none left when I got there, however (demonstrating the efficacy of our new restrictive off licence laws), so I plumped for a lager I'd not had in ages and never reviewed here: the legend that is Pilsner Urquell.

The original beer from Plzeň, an SABMiller brand these days, pours as golden and as fizzy as one might expect. Those very Czech hops stand up well against the hot and sour vindaloo sauce -- the sharp bitterness cutting through the spice with each mouthful. After eating it's even better, refreshing and cleansing the palate. Sitting over it a bit longer, a funny thing happens: as it warms, the malt comes out in the flavour profile. Of course, this sort of beer is meant to be served cold, but at temperatures approaching cellar, and beyond, it offers a wonderfully balanced experience, with the sweet porridgey grains enhanced with the Saaz sharpness.

Pilsner Urquell is a beer worth savouring and I'm glad there was no Asahi.

12 comments:

  1. How about traditional curry beers? Tiger, kingfisher, cobra etc how do you rate those?

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  2. I've a definite soft spot for Cobra, even though it's rubbish. I don't see much Kingfisher, but I have enjoyed it in the past. Tiger is utter rubbish, though.

    Also, I found Time works quite well as a curry beer too. If it's still around, that is.

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  3. I'm also in the Pilsner Urquell camp. Lately, it's been my go-to beer when I just want to sit back and enjoy something without maniacally scribbling notes about it.

    As for the curry connection, I too have made some interesting discoveries.

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  4. Pilsner Urquell is a wonderful beer. It's the first lager I'll reach for in the offie (and usually the only one).

    I enjoyed Time on the few occasions I tried it.

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  5. I've a definite soft spot for Cobra, even though it's rubbish.

    Brilliant. John, I love you! You can't be a ticker - you're human!

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  6. I sank 2 litres of this stuff a few weeks ago in The Czech Inn and don't think I have enjoyed a session as much in quite a while. I plan to do the very same thing this evening. The malt was outstanding on draught, with serious depth and vanilla notes.

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  7. Is that an open invitation, Thom? Or are you just encouraging stalkers?

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  8. Anonymous11:42 am

    If your in London, check out The Brew Wharf for a few pints of the original Golden Beer

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  9. I visited Brew Wharf last year and enjoyed their beer. Some day I hope to have saved enough money to buy a second pint.

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  10. Do you not taste some skunkiness/light strike in the bottled Pils Urquell? I find it detracts from what is otherwise a tasty brew.

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  11. Can't say I did, Geoff, but it's not something I'm especially sensitive to.

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  12. Glad to hear you got it in good shape — a lot of people have commented on problems with Pilsner Urquell abroad. And yet when it's in form, it's fantastic.

    In the Czech Republic, there are two versions of Pilsner Urquell on draft: pasteurized (from kegs) and unpasteurized (from tanks). For most locals, the unpasteurized version is acres ahead of the kegged beer. Unfortunately, the last I heard is that the unpasteurized tank beer is still not available outside the Czech lands.

    Well, there has to be some advantage to being here.

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